Panglossnotes

Jan 10
newyorker:

A cartoon by Matthew Diffee. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1dJy9v9

newyorker:

A cartoon by Matthew Diffee. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1dJy9v9


Jan 9

Oct 24
laphamsquarterly:

Juggs, a monthly magazine of ideas and mammoth breasts founded by Lewis H. Lapham in 1981 following his editorship of Harper’s Magazine. Started as a passion project to explore Lapham’s deep interest in postmodern aesthetics, enormous double D-tits, and literary culture, Juggs is today regarded as one of the finest and most astute knocker-themed perotdiclas and sources of commentary in the country.
Lapham left Juggs in 2006 to assume editorship of the small-press literary journal Finally Legal. 
from The Onion Book of Known Knowledge

I’d wondered what Lewis had been up to prior to 2006.

laphamsquarterly:

Juggs, a monthly magazine of ideas and mammoth breasts founded by Lewis H. Lapham in 1981 following his editorship of Harper’s Magazine. Started as a passion project to explore Lapham’s deep interest in postmodern aesthetics, enormous double D-tits, and literary culture, Juggs is today regarded as one of the finest and most astute knocker-themed perotdiclas and sources of commentary in the country.

Lapham left Juggs in 2006 to assume editorship of the small-press literary journal Finally Legal

from The Onion Book of Known Knowledge

I’d wondered what Lewis had been up to prior to 2006.


Sep 30
“Tikkun”

Los Angeles Review of Books - Drone Warfare: Tiqqun, The Young-Girl And The Imperialism Of The Trivial

Why be drawn into reading yet another interesting essay on the stunning LARB site? In the opening paragraph they mentioned Tikkun a magazine I buy at the Elgin Street store in YOW called Mags & Fags. I don’t subscript but should but also like an excuse to rustle in the other interesting things I don’t read and don’t see on the web they have usually.

I like Rabbi Lerner and what and how he says it. Suspect we need more of him and less of those favoured by ………. .

Ha, a link to Tikkum the magazine not I think provided by the LARBs and to its blog . Here is for those not afraid of listening to Rabbi Lerner a link to him chit chatting with Phillip Adams, from down-under, on the real ABC.


Sep 29

Sep 10

Sep 3

Sep 1

Aug 31
Before I ran off to sea, in the early 60’s, Rowdy Yates and Wishbone were two of my favourite characters on TV. Rowdy, of course, morphed into Clint Eastwood and a varied and storied set of accomplishments on the BIG screen; my favourite of which is The Unforgiven; I know this ‘cause I watch it regularly and, yes, I’m examining myself because I’m also wondering why it’s my favourite.
Clint seems to maybe have had a good theatrical idea for his speech last night at the GOP blowout - posing questions to a person, Obama, not present and thus the uncomfortable looking chair acting as his standin - but also he seems to have had no rehearsals before the performance thus the incoherence of the delivery at times; and, worst of all, no good, script writer or director - like himself in the latter case - to help deliver the idea thus the “what the fuck was that” wonderings, as people, of a certain age, thought of a version of Michael Cimino’s film Heaven’s Gate in which you could actually hear what was being said, by the actors and actresses on screen, and still wanted your money back out front at the box office.
I remember my pre-Navy life as a happy time to mask some of it’s awfulness and Rowdy and Wishbone helped me do that but I knew the actors I saw on a BIG or small screen were not as individual human beings the same thing. I knew that with rare exceptions the people I saw and liked were really stand-ins for the writers who wrote what was said and those writers words were what effected me emotionally and intellectually. 
If you really want to know when this struck me - actors only spout others thoughts - forcibly it was before I went to sea and I was watching an interview with the actor E.G. Marshall. He was popular for a time, and I very much liked the TV series I watched him in which was called The Defenders. In the series, he played both a clever legal counsellor and wise human being. In the interview he sounded to me like the rest of us; a generally dull uninteresting run-of-the-mill schmuck with no great insights and with all the prejudices and uncontrolled worries of John Doe during the “cold war”. He was, of course speaking for himself and without a well crafted script.
laphamsquarterly:

“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.” 
—Michel de Montaigne, 1580B

Before I ran off to sea, in the early 60’s, Rowdy Yates and Wishbone were two of my favourite characters on TV. Rowdy, of course, morphed into Clint Eastwood and a varied and storied set of accomplishments on the BIG screen; my favourite of which is The Unforgiven; I know this ‘cause I watch it regularly and, yes, I’m examining myself because I’m also wondering why it’s my favourite.

Clint seems to maybe have had a good theatrical idea for his speech last night at the GOP blowout - posing questions to a person, Obama, not present and thus the uncomfortable looking chair acting as his standin - but also he seems to have had no rehearsals before the performance thus the incoherence of the delivery at times; and, worst of all, no good, script writer or director - like himself in the latter case - to help deliver the idea thus the “what the fuck was that” wonderings, as people, of a certain age, thought of a version of Michael Cimino’s film Heaven’s Gate in which you could actually hear what was being said, by the actors and actresses on screen, and still wanted your money back out front at the box office.

I remember my pre-Navy life as a happy time to mask some of it’s awfulness and Rowdy and Wishbone helped me do that but I knew the actors I saw on a BIG or small screen were not as individual human beings the same thing. I knew that with rare exceptions the people I saw and liked were really stand-ins for the writers who wrote what was said and those writers words were what effected me emotionally and intellectually. 

If you really want to know when this struck me - actors only spout others thoughts - forcibly it was before I went to sea and I was watching an interview with the actor E.G. Marshall. He was popular for a time, and I very much liked the TV series I watched him in which was called The Defenders. In the series, he played both a clever legal counsellor and wise human being. In the interview he sounded to me like the rest of us; a generally dull uninteresting run-of-the-mill schmuck with no great insights and with all the prejudices and uncontrolled worries of John Doe during the “cold war”. He was, of course speaking for himself and without a well crafted script.

laphamsquarterly:

“Nothing is so firmly believed as that which we least know.” 

Michel de Montaigne, 1580B


Aug 18
newyorker:

The New Yorker’s Swimsuit Issue wouldn’t be complete without a swimsuit-cartoon slideshow. Click-through to see more: http://nyr.kr/OrXqdk

As I’m about to eat a medium sized steak [considered length and width wise as it’s close to 2 inches thick]  with bake potato and broccoli - no sour cream for the baked spud just my garlic flavoured/infused olive oil - I think this is funny.

newyorker:

The New Yorker’s Swimsuit Issue wouldn’t be complete without a swimsuit-cartoon slideshow. Click-through to see more: http://nyr.kr/OrXqdk

As I’m about to eat a medium sized steak [considered length and width wise as it’s close to 2 inches thick]  with bake potato and broccoli - no sour cream for the baked spud just my garlic flavoured/infused olive oil - I think this is funny.


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